Power Breakfast: Federal Investigation Of W. Va. Coal Mining Accident | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Power Breakfast: Federal Investigation Of W. Va. Coal Mining Accident

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Senator Joe Manchin, spoke last week at a hearing on the accident and the ongoing federal investigation.

"This has not been forgotten. It will not be forgotten," he said. "We want the families to know that we're doing everything humanly possible. We want to make sure we have the technical changes to make it safer."

Manchin, the former West Virginia Governor, is not a member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, but he sat in on the hearing. At such times, Congress walks a fine line on the path to new regulatory solutions.

"First of all, what you do is you look at the laws you have on the books and, have they been enforced? And we know -- and I'm not blaming -- but it's everyone's fault," Manchin says. "They could have done a much better job of enforcing what laws were on the books. But you've got to be careful about throwing more laws on when you're not even enforcing what you have. That's the concern I think a lot of people had. There's some areas where they don't have enough enforcement powers that they need."

The final results of a federal investigation will be released June 29 at the U.S. Labor Department's mine safety offices in the town of Beckley.

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