WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

D.C. Lawmaker Wants Pension Reform For Teachers, Firefighters And Police

Play associated audio
To cut costs, D.C. Council Member David Catania is proposing delaying when cost of living adjustments kick in for firefighters and police officers in the District.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/bootbearwdc/111645478
To cut costs, D.C. Council Member David Catania is proposing delaying when cost of living adjustments kick in for firefighters and police officers in the District.

To bend the curve, he wants to limit the cost of living adjustments or COLAs and, more significantly, require that these COLAS only kick in at the social security full-retirement age, which can begin at the age of 65.

Because of the rough nature of their work, firefighters and police officers can now retire with these benefits at the age of 50.

Not surprisingly, there is strong opposition to the bill.

This may be one of the few times the head of the police union, Kris Baumann, and MPD Police Chief Cathy Lanier are on the same page.

"It's gonna kill our ability to recruit and retain officers," says Baumann.

"You know our goal is public safety and I just think it's going to impact public safety if it goes through the way it is," says Lanier.

Baumann says the pension fund is fully funded and a conservative plan compared to many states.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 23

You can liven up your step with some funky, reggae music or dance like you’re the only person riding the Metro.

NPR

Fast-Food CEOs Earn Supersize Salaries; Workers Earn Small Potatoes

A new report finds that the average compensation of fast-food CEOs has quadrupled since 2000. By comparison, worker wages have increased less than 1 percent.
WAMU 88.5

McDonnell Legal Defense Fund Has Raised $150,000 This Year

The legal defense fund for Bob and Maureen McDonnell has raised nearly $150,000 during the first quarter this year, including several thousand from former GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney.

NPR

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

Amazon, Google, Microsoft and others are competing to be the main landlords of the cloud. Their terms and prices could control who gets to build what on the Internet, and for how much.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.