WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Virginia Redistricting Begins In Earnest, Loudoun Awaits Changes

Play associated audio

The population boom over the course of the last decade in Loudoun County means the area could gain two state delegate districts and one state Senate district.

Democrat Stevens Miller is a Loudoun County supervisor, widely believed to be eyeing a run for state Senate, should a new district be created.

He says increased representation for the county and Northern Virginia means local delegates will be under more pressure to get things done.

"We've waited 10 years for this," Miller says, "and if they're as good as their word, Mr. Rust, Mr. May, Mr. Lemunyon, and Mr. Greason will all come through, and they'll bring us back our tax money."

But the population growth also means local districts will be shrinking in geographic area. Republican Del. Bob Marshall says he may no longer represent any part of Loudoun County when all is said and done.

"I'm losing areas, under one of these plans, where I've represented people for 20 years, and I've had precinct captains who've worked for me for for 20 years," Marshall says. "So a lot of things are changing there."

Lawmakers currently have one House proposal, two Senate proposals, and a plan put forth by the Governor's Redistricting Commission to consider.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 24

You can see a creative dance group perform a physical ode to the natural world or check out an indie-soul singer who uses music to pay tribute to her roots.
NPR

Obama Gets A Taste Of Jiro's 'Dream' Sushi In Name Of Diplomacy

On the first leg of his Asian tour, the president stopped by the iconic sushi restaurant. David Gelb, who directed a documentary about the restaurant, says eating there is amazing and nerve-wracking.
WAMU 88.5

Environmentalists Turn To Campaign Finance Reform To Advance Cause

Frustrated by the lobbying power of oil and gas companies, environmenalists are joining the call for campaign finance reform in Washington.

NPR

FCC Set To Change Net Neutrality Rules

On Thursday, the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission will propose new rules for how broadband providers should treat the Internet traffic flowing through their networks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.