WAMU 88.5 : News

VCU Loses In Final Four But Gains Spotlight And Recognition

Play associated audio

VCU fans could tell early in the second half their team was struggling against Butler, but the loss was watched by millions of people and the NCAA tournament also broke its viewership record this year. That's a big spotlight for the small school. Gian Macone says even though the loss was painful, the school benefits from its brief time on the national stage.

"This is the new George Mason. Just like the Cinderella story that happened to George Mason a few years ago, this is going to help VCU," Macone says.

A professor at George Mason estimates their school got close to $700 million in free advertising from making it to the Final Four in 2006. Admissions inquiries also spiked 350 percent and its alumni got much more active.

Kelli Burke, who studies social work at VCU, says this puts the Rams on the map.

"I think a lot of people didn't even know who VCU was before the Final Four," Burke says.

VCU lost to Butler who is also considered an underdog, so the two schools will be fighting for the attention of recruits and donors.

NPR

A Swedish Curmudgeon Wins Hearts, On The Page, And Now On Screen

Move over, Girl with the Dragon Tattoo — a grumpy man may soon take your place as America's favorite fictional Swede. The film adaptation of the best-seller A Man Called Ove is now coming to the U.S.
NPR

A Growing Champagne Trend Is Uncorking More Ways To Celebrate

Champagne shouldn't be just for special occasions, says wine writer David White. He explains how to choose it, how to pair it with food and how small growers are changing the industry.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - September 30, 2016

D.C.'s statehood activists rally while the Council opens debate on a state constitution. An appeals court reviews Virginia's voter ID law. And Prince George's County contends with a spate of incidents involving sexual abuse of school kids.

NPR

Our Robot Overlords Are Now Delivering Pizza, And Cooking It On The Go

A Silicon Valley startup wants to use technology to solve the pizza paradox. It's a food that's meant to be delivered but never tastes quite as good upon arrival.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.