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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(April 4-10) URBAN OPERA If you've been waiting for someone to breathe fresh air into opera, you may find what you've been looking for in UrbanArias. The Washington-based troupe has been known to work Skype chats, knife throwing, and I Love Lucy into their short, adventurous performances. You can catch Ricky Ian Gordon's "Orpheus and Euridice" tomorrow night at Arlington's Artisphere.

(April 4-23) ART VON EICHEL What's most interesting about the paintings of Julia von Eichel is that they're potentially different every time you see them. The artist uses razorblades to etch images onto a think layer of burnished oil pant. Her elaborate carvings vary depending on your angle and light at Addison/Ripley Fine Art in Northwest Washington through the end of the month.

(April 4-April 7) CONFORMIST AND MAMMA Silver Spring's AFI Silver has brand new prints of two films that take you to Italy through Thursday. Pier Paolo Pasolini's "Mamma Roma" tells the tale of a prostitute who attempts to leave her trade for the sake of her son. And Bernardo Bertolucci's masterpiece "The Conformist" chronicles the desperate attempts of one man to conform to 1930s fascism.

Music: "Something About Us" by Daft Punk

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