WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Latest D.C. News

Play associated audio

WASHINGTON (AP) All of the principal cast members from Arena Stage's 2010 revival of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "Oklahoma!" will return for another run this summer. The theater says the production will run from July 8th through October 9th.

WASHINGTON (AP) Officials say a police campaign will target and ticket people who don't obey traffic laws. That includes pedestrians, bikers and drivers. City officials say the number of walkers and cyclists struck in the city increased by nearly 25 percent compared to the previous year.

WASHINGTON (AP) City records show that for more than six months D.C. Council member Marion Barry has been driving a silver Jaguar that has "inactive" tags and isn't registered with the Department of Motor Vehicles. Documents obtained by The Washington Post show the license plate on Barry's car belonged to the BMW he had been driving before he sold it.

WASHINGTON (AP) Two lawmakers are working to revive legislation in Congress to create a National Women's History Museum in Washington after an earlier effort expired in the Senate. The House passed a bill in 2009 to create the museum, but time ran out during that congressional session for the Senate to vote.

(Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


From Trembling Teacher To Seasoned Mentor: How Tim Gunn Made It Work

Gunn, the mentor to young designers on Project Runway, has been a teacher and educator for decades. But he spent his childhood "absolutely hating, hating, hating, hating school," he says.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Reviving Payoff For Prediction – Of Terrorism Risk

Could an electronic market where people bet on the likelihood of attacks deter terrorism? NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about the potential for a terror prediction market.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.