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WASHINGTON (AP) All of the principal cast members from Arena Stage's 2010 revival of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "Oklahoma!" will return for another run this summer. The theater says the production will run from July 8th through October 9th.

WASHINGTON (AP) Officials say a police campaign will target and ticket people who don't obey traffic laws. That includes pedestrians, bikers and drivers. City officials say the number of walkers and cyclists struck in the city increased by nearly 25 percent compared to the previous year.

WASHINGTON (AP) City records show that for more than six months D.C. Council member Marion Barry has been driving a silver Jaguar that has "inactive" tags and isn't registered with the Department of Motor Vehicles. Documents obtained by The Washington Post show the license plate on Barry's car belonged to the BMW he had been driving before he sold it.

WASHINGTON (AP) Two lawmakers are working to revive legislation in Congress to create a National Women's History Museum in Washington after an earlier effort expired in the Senate. The House passed a bill in 2009 to create the museum, but time ran out during that congressional session for the Senate to vote.

(Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

NPR

MTV's Rewinding The '90s With A New Channel

The '90s are back! Pokémon has taken over the world again. A Clinton is running for president. And now, MTV is reviving '90s favorites like Beavis and Butt-head on a new channel, MTV Classic.
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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