'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(March 31) AFROBEATS AT BOSSA Bossa Bistro & Lounge has AfroBeat for Your Soul Thursday night in Adams Morgan. You may want to break out your dancing shoes as the venue welcomes DJs and live bands to spin and sing some of the jazziest and funkiest songs the genre has to offer.

(March 31-Nov. 27) WORDY WALLS American muralist Hildreth Meière spent a large part of her prolific career producing monumental Art Deco works inside landmark buildings all over the country. Washington's National Building Museum has the first major retrospective of her career in "Walls Speak: The Narrative Art of Hildreth Meière" through late November.

(April 1-May 15) OPEN CHARM CITY The Maryland Institute College of Art has an honest conversation about the nature of Baltimore's neighborhoods in "Open City". The sense of belonging felt by Charm City's residents is explored in lectures, art, and interactive exhibits Friday through mid-May at the former North Avenue Market.

Music: "Revenge Of The Flying Monkeys" by Ayetoro

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