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USA Today Investigates DCPS Success, Possible Cheating

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D.C. Public Schools issued more than 400 layoff notices to teachers and staff July 15. That's almost double the amount of notices issued last year.
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D.C. Public Schools issued more than 400 layoff notices to teachers and staff July 15. That's almost double the amount of notices issued last year.

Documents obtained by USA Today show some high-scoring schools touted by former Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee had extraordinarily high numbers of erasures correcting wrong answers.

The newspaper singles out Noyes Elementary -- a National Blue Ribbon School -- as being flagged for a high rate of wrong-to-right erasures.

On the 2009 reading test, for example, seventh-graders in one Noyes classroom averaged more than 12 wrong-to-right erasures per student; while the average for seventh-graders in all D.C. schools was not even one.

In a statement Monday, DCPS says it adheres to stringent guidelines, investigates schools based on erasure data and does not hesitate to act quickly in cases of misuse.

Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson says erasures alone are not evidence of cheating.

WAMU 88.5

Introducing Capital Soundtrack, A New WAMU Music Project

What does Washington sound like? Capital Soundtrack, a new music project from WAMU 88.5, explores that question.
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Evaporated Cane Juice? Puh-leeze. Just Call It Sugar, FDA Says

Companies cultivating a healthful image often list "evaporated cane juice" in their products' ingredients. But the FDA says it's really just sugar, and that's what food labels should call it.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - May 27, 2016

Congress votes to override DC's 2013 ballot initiative on budget autonomy. Virginia governor faces a federal investigation over international finance and lobbying rules. And DC, Maryland and Virginia move to create a Metro safety oversight panel.

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With Shuttles Gone, Private Ventures Give Florida's Space Coast A Lift

Five years after NASA's shuttle program ended, a new Florida aerospace industry is beginning to take shape. Firms, from those making jets to tiny Internet satellites, are adding factories and jobs.

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