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USA Today Investigates DCPS Success, Possible Cheating

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D.C. Public Schools issued more than 400 layoff notices to teachers and staff July 15. That's almost double the amount of notices issued last year.
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D.C. Public Schools issued more than 400 layoff notices to teachers and staff July 15. That's almost double the amount of notices issued last year.

Documents obtained by USA Today show some high-scoring schools touted by former Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee had extraordinarily high numbers of erasures correcting wrong answers.

The newspaper singles out Noyes Elementary -- a National Blue Ribbon School -- as being flagged for a high rate of wrong-to-right erasures.

On the 2009 reading test, for example, seventh-graders in one Noyes classroom averaged more than 12 wrong-to-right erasures per student; while the average for seventh-graders in all D.C. schools was not even one.

In a statement Monday, DCPS says it adheres to stringent guidelines, investigates schools based on erasure data and does not hesitate to act quickly in cases of misuse.

Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson says erasures alone are not evidence of cheating.

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