Arlington Receives Pentagon Stone Recovered On 9/11 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Arlington Receives Pentagon Stone Recovered On 9/11

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The stone weighs 800 pounds.
Michael Pope
The stone weighs 800 pounds.

Arlington Police officer Jim Wasem was one of the first responders who arrived on the scene after American Airlines Flight 77 slammed into west side of the Pentagon. Now that the Army is presenting a part of the building's stone facade to the Fire Department, the details of that day are coming flooding back.

"It's a little overwhelming, honestly. It brings back a lot of memories that I didn't think I had," Wasem says.

For the last decade, the stone recovered from the Pentagon that day have been in storage at Fort McNair. But now the Army is presenting part of it to the Arlington County Fire Department, which provided the first emergency response that day.

Major General James Jackson was commander of the U.S. Army Military District of Washington that day.

"It is a remembrance of the dedication of the members of our own organizations to ensure that we are prepared for the next 9/11," he says.

The stone will be on display along with a piece of steel recovered from the World Trade Center next to Arlington's Fire Station Number Five.

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