After Crackdown, ICE Still Has Critics On Both Sides | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

After Crackdown, ICE Still Has Critics On Both Sides

Play associated audio
The immigrants arrested represent more than 32 different nations, including countries in Latin America, the Middle East, Asia, the Caribbean and Africa.
ICE
The immigrants arrested represent more than 32 different nations, including countries in Latin America, the Middle East, Asia, the Caribbean and Africa.

But ICE's tactics are still getting criticism from both sides of the immigration debate.

Prince William County Board of Supervisors Chair Corey Stewart applauded the arrests -- 37 of which happened in his county.

But in a statement released after the ICE announcement, Stewart said the federal government still must start keeping illegal immigrants in custody until they are deported.

State Del. Bob Marshall, a Republican from Manassas, agrees that ICE still has more to prove when it comes to enforcing immigration laws.

"I'm glad that it has taken place," Marshall says of the three-day enforcement surge. "I think this is a good building block -- but we need to go further."

ICE Director John Morton says his agency made 130 arrests of illegal immigrants with criminal backgrounds including rape, burglary and drug possession.

But 21 additional arrests were made of undocumented individuals without a criminal record.

John Steinbach, with the local immigrant advocacy group Mexicans Without Borders, says it's those arrests that are driving a wedge between ethnic minorities and law enforcement.

"Police are seen as a danger to the community, and we're afraid that crimes aren't going to be reported and that trust is being eroded," he says.

Steinbach believes the only solution to the problem is a path to citizenship for undocumented workers.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Sept. 2

You can see a selection of Chinese films or meditate on the meaning of the word “axis” at an art exhibition.

NPR

These 5 Crops Are Still Hand-Harvested, And It's Hard Work

Saffron, vanilla, palm oil, cacao and cottonseed oil are still picked by hand in some parts of the world. Sometimes that manual labor shows up in the price of the food; sometimes it doesn't.
NPR

The Politics Of Calling In Sick

A growing grass-roots movement aims to establish paid sick leave in the U.S., enjoying some success at the city and state level. The issue is already playing big in 2014 political races.
NPR

Why Do We Blindly Sign Terms Of Service Agreements?

Audie Cornish talks with University of Chicago Law School professor Omri Ben-Shahar about terms of service agreements for software and websites.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.