WAMU 88.5 : News

Study Abroad Programs In Asia, Middle East Uncertain

Play associated audio

CET Academic Programs had a small group of students in Osaka, Japan, when the earthquake hit. Due in part to concern about radiation, program organizers had to make a tough call last week.

"We did make the decision to bring them home, in part because there was so much uncertainty," says Director Mark Lenhart.

Lenhart says the plan right now is to send students back in a week or so when things settle down. Unfortunately, that can't be guaranteed, and Japan Programs Manager Kate Maruyama says some students planning to attend the summer program are getting nervous.

"We've gotten a couple students saying it's too dangerous to go to Japan right now, so I'm not applying anymore," Maruyama says.

George Washington University junior Alaina Howser still plans to attend, but she's confronting uncertainty as well.

"There's still radiation contamination issues going about, so I'm still concerned, so is my mother," Howser says.

CET also has a program in Syria, a country that's seen growing unrest. CET has not canceled the program at this point, but the organization is keeping a very close eye on the situation.

NPR

Smithsonian Sets Phasers To Restore On Original Starship Enterprise

The Starship Enterprise — from the original Star Trek series — has gotten a restoration fit for a real life spacecraft. It goes on display this week at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.
NPR

In Quest For Happier Chickens, Perdue Shifts How Birds Live And Die

Perdue Farms, one of the largest poultry companies in the country, says it will change its slaughter methods and also some of its poultry houses. Animal welfare groups are cheering.
WAMU 88.5

Jonathan Rauch On How American Politics Went Insane

Party insiders and backroom deals: One author on why we need to bring back old-time politics.

WAMU 88.5

Episode 5: Why 1986 Still Matters

In 1986, a federal official issued a warning: If Metro continued to expand rapidly, the system faced a future of stark choices over maintaining existing infrastructure. Metro chose expansion. We talk to a historian about that decision. We also hear from a former Metro general manager about the following years, and from an Arlington planner about measuring how riders are responding to SafeTrack.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.