Study Abroad Programs In Asia, Middle East Uncertain | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Study Abroad Programs In Asia, Middle East Uncertain

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CET Academic Programs had a small group of students in Osaka, Japan, when the earthquake hit. Due in part to concern about radiation, program organizers had to make a tough call last week.

"We did make the decision to bring them home, in part because there was so much uncertainty," says Director Mark Lenhart.

Lenhart says the plan right now is to send students back in a week or so when things settle down. Unfortunately, that can't be guaranteed, and Japan Programs Manager Kate Maruyama says some students planning to attend the summer program are getting nervous.

"We've gotten a couple students saying it's too dangerous to go to Japan right now, so I'm not applying anymore," Maruyama says.

George Washington University junior Alaina Howser still plans to attend, but she's confronting uncertainty as well.

"There's still radiation contamination issues going about, so I'm still concerned, so is my mother," Howser says.

CET also has a program in Syria, a country that's seen growing unrest. CET has not canceled the program at this point, but the organization is keeping a very close eye on the situation.

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