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Md. Tap Water Advocates Say No To Bottled Water

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Two of these cups hold tap water, bottled water in the rest. Subjects had to sample each and see if they could tell which is which.
Elliott Francis
Two of these cups hold tap water, bottled water in the rest. Subjects had to sample each and see if they could tell which is which.

The folks from the 'Kick The Bottles Out' campaign say clever marketing designed to discourage you from drinking tap water, in favor of bottled water, is why we pay for a resource readily available in every home.

They have a taste test to prove their point.

Emma Devries sets up four cups of water. Tap water in two, bottled in the rest. The subject has to sample each to see if they can tell which is which.

(Subject) "I think it's that commercial brand" (Devries) "You think its Dasani?..." (Subject) "...Yes!"'

The subject was wrong.

(Devries) "You thought tap water was Dasani." (Subject) "Wow!"

All of this is quite un-scientific, but the members, part of a national coalition, are quite determined in their effort to reduce the use of bottled water.

So far they've convinced 17 businesses in the state to go bottle water free.

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