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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(March 23-24) IN GOOD COMPANY The Paul Taylor Dance Company is known for consistently breaking new ground by consistently busting new moves. The Company's latest productions are at the Kennedy Center's Eisenhower Theater Wednesday night and Thursday. One's about a mysterious dancing love triangle, another explores innocence, and the last one features a tap-dancing horse.

(March 23-April 3) THE TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL There isn't much dancing in Horton Foote's "The Trip to Bountiful", but there's plenty of heart. Widow Carrie Watts spends most of her day dreaming about leaving the Houston apartment she shares with her son and self-absorbed daughter-in-law. And then, she does. But it's about the journey not the destination. The Trip lasts through early April at Round House Theatre in Bethesda.

(March 23-May 15) PHILIP GUSTON, MEET PHILLIPS COLLECTION If you wouldn't mind a trip to Rome, but can't swing the airfare, the next best and closest thing might be Philip Guston's Roma at The Phillips Collection in Northwest Washington through mid-May. The late American painter's playful pink cartoon-like pictures evoke the art and culture of Italy in the early 70s.

Music: "Disco Balls" by Flying Lotus

NPR

MTV's Rewinding The '90s With A New Channel

The '90s are back! Pokémon has taken over the world again. A Clinton is running for president. And now, MTV is reviving '90s favorites like Beavis and Butt-head on a new channel, MTV Classic.
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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