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WASHINGTON (AP) Officials say an overheated kiln in a ceramics studio early today at the Corcoran Gallery of Art has not damaged any artwork. The museum will reopen as scheduled tomorrow. No injuries were reported in the fire.

WASHINGTON (AP) An elementary school boy accused of bringing cocaine to school and sharing it with students will leave foster care and will be reunited with his mother. Four Thomson Elementary School students had sore throats after sniffing or swallowing the drug last week.

WASHINGTON (AP) The Kennedy Center in Washington is honoring 10 teachers with $10,000 grants for inspiring students after they were selected from hundreds of nominees. The grants honor Broadway composer Stephen Sondheim and are being announced today.

WASHINGTON (AP) The National Park Service says repairs are scheduled to begin next month on Washington's heavily traveled Constitution Avenue. Crews soon will be ripping out pavement, crosswalk lights and sidewalks.

WASHINGTON (AP) Officials in Washington have begun an annual month-long campaign to fill potholes. Yesterday was officially the first day of the "Potholepalooza" campaign. Mayor Vincent Gray helped fill potholes in the city's southeast.

WASHINGTON (AP) A D.C. police officer charged in an internal sting with trying to receive stolen property is due in court. Guillermo Ortiz faces a determination of attorney hearing today in D.C. Superior Court. He was arrested along with two other officers in a sting this month.

(Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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