'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(March 22-Oct. 2) NAM JUNE PAIK IN THE TOWER The late Nam June Paik was a pioneer in visual art and is considered to be the first video artist. "In the Tower" brings 20 of the Korean-American's works to Washington's National Gallery of Art through October. The exhibition features Pake's drawings as well as some of his trademark closed-circuit video installations.

(March 22) SAM GILLIAM'S ABSTRACT UNDERSTANDING Sam Gilliam is something of a pioneer, too. The Washingtonian by-way-of Mississippi broke new ground in abstract expressionism while painting at the Washington Color School in the 1960s and 70s. He discusses his signature draped canvases and his career Tuesday night at Hood College in Frederick.

(March 22-April 10) CURTAIN CALL Arlington's Signature Theatre stages a show about a pioneering act of theatrical proportions through mid-April. Set in 1866, "And The Curtain Rises" re-imagines the decisive days around the creation of the first American musical.

Music: "Oh Superman" featuring Laurie Anderson by M.A.N.D.Y. vs. Booka Shade

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