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Gray Does Not 'Envision' Tax Increase In Upcoming Budget

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D.C. Mayor Vince Gray, once a supporter of the underground Metro Station at Dulles Airport now says it's too expensive.
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D.C. Mayor Vince Gray, once a supporter of the underground Metro Station at Dulles Airport now says it's too expensive.

Since becoming mayor, Gray has repeatedly said everything is on the table when it comes to closing the city's $300 million budget shortfall, meaning there could be a tax increase.

Monday Gray tackled the question of a potential tax hike, and while he didn't take it off the table, he came very close.

"We've had discussions about tax increases. I do not envision any property tax increases, we do not envision any income tax increases. You know, across the board tax increases -– I don't envision anything like that," he says.

And regarding D.C.'s sales tax, Gray says he doesn't see that going up either.

So how will the mayor close the gap? Besides cutting spending, Gray says there are other options, in terms of raising additional revenue, but he wouldn't disclose what they are.

The mayor must submit his spending plan to the council on April 1.

Gray launched an online survey Friday for citizens to provide their budget priorities. The survey will remain online until April 1, when it will be replaced with a copy of the budget and related documents.

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