Power Breakfast: The Nuclear Industry Discussed At Capitol Hill | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Power Breakfast: The Nuclear Industry Discussed At Capitol Hill

Play associated audio

Suffice it to say, the Capitol is crawling with nuclear industry lobbyists this week. Loosely speaking, members of Congress fall into one of three categories.

There are the committed nuclear advocates - like Senator Lamar Alexander, Republican of Tennessee.

"We have 104 commercial reactors in the country," says Alexander. "There's never been a death in connection with any of them; there's never been a death... never been a death in connection with the nuclear Navy since 1950s, and no one was hurt at Three Mile Island."

Then there are skeptics. Congressman Henry Waxman, Democrat of California, notes that Japan's nuclear industry is capable of putting in place the best available safeguards.

"Obviously it wasn't enough to stop what's happening in Japan. We want to know what planning has been taking place in the U.S., what additional safeguards they may have," says Waxman.

Our theoretical Geiger Counter might be especially noisy around the offices of members like Senator Joe Lieberman.

"I don't favor a moratorium. I don't know enough now to favor a moratorium," Lieberman admits.

The Connecticut Independent now finds himself seemingly back-peddling.

"I'm a strong supporter of building nuclear power plants because this is American-made energy... and don't emit air pollution," he says. "BUT we would be irresponsible if we didn't just step back for a moment and see if there are any lessons for us to learn from what's happened."

NPR

Former Basketball Player Scores As A Filmmaker

While Deon Taylor was playing professional basketball in Germany, he had an epiphany: he wanted to make movies. The self-taught director's latest film, Supremacy, was released this Friday.
NPR

Surströmming Revisited: Eating Sweden's Famously Stinky Fish

Sweden has the distinction of producing surströmming, one of the foulest-smelling foods in the world. More than a decade ago, NPR's Ari Shapiro tried eating it and failed. It's time for a rematch.
NPR

What Romney's Retreat Means For GOP Hopefuls

NPR's Scott Simon speaks with senior Washington editor Ron Elving about the narrowing Republican presidential field for 2016 and what we've seen so far in the first month of the new Congress.
NPR

The Infinite Whiteness Of Public Radio Voices

The hashtag #publicradiovoices, about the "whiteness" of public radio, trended on Twitter this week. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch team about the conversation.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.