Police Review Forensic Evidence In Bethesda Murder Case | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Police Review Forensic Evidence In Bethesda Murder Case

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Lululemon on Bethesda Row was lined with flowers Monday. Two women, one dead and the other sexually assaulted, were found here Saturday morning.
Jessica Jordan
Lululemon on Bethesda Row was lined with flowers Monday. Two women, one dead and the other sexually assaulted, were found here Saturday morning.

ORIGINAL POST: Police investigating the murder of 30-year-old Jayna Murray at a yoga store in Bethesda, Md., are turning to new clues to try to solve the case.

Detectives believe forensic testing of evidence they've gathered from the crime scene could bring them closer to finding two suspects who they believe murdered Murray and sexually assaulted another employee at the LuluLemon yoga store in downtown Bethesda Friday.

"It's gonna take some time to go through that volume and prioritize and determine how it will be useful, and then what direction that evidence will take the case," says Montgomery County Police Captain Paul Starks.

Although the store was not running surveillance video at the time of the murder, police are reviewing tape from nearby businesses.

Murray and her co-worker locked up the store around 9:45 p.m. Friday but returned later that night, around 10:05 p.m., to retrieve something they'd forgotten.

Police believe that's when two masked men entered through the unlocked front door and viciously attacked the women.

Investigators say the robbers were 6 feet tall and 5 feet 3 inches tall.

The owners of the store have announced they're offering $125,000 to anyone who can help the police find, apprehend and convict the two male suspects. Police officials are asking the public to contact Montgomery County's Crime Solvers with more information.

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