WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Educare School In D.C. To Focus On Infants, Toddlers

Play associated audio

Want to increase graduation rates and boost employment? Then, Portia Kennel says, you better start early. Very early.

"The great deal of learning that takes place in the first five years of life is greater than any time in the development of a human being," Kennel says. "What a wasted opportunity for us to wait until children enter school in kindergarten at 5 years old, when the brain's development has already been going on and has developed almost 80 percent of its capacity."

Kennel helps oversee a series of schools called Educare, which are designed to improve services for infants and toddlers from low-income families. The goal, she says, isn't to narrow the achievement gap. It's to prevent it.

"The longer and longer we wait, the greater the gap and the more it's gonna cost us to narrow that gap. So why not invest now? Because you're gonna have to pay later," she says.

Next spring, Educare will open its first District outpost in the Parkside-Kenilworth neighborhood of Northeast D.C, where it will serve 171 children from birth to age 5.

NPR

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
NPR

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

More than 80 percent of people in South Korea live in cities. But in the last few years, that has started to change. Tens of thousands of South Koreans are relocating to the countryside each year.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Republicans Warn Of High Energy Costs With Obama's 'Clean Power Plan'

Republican leaders in Virginia say Obama's clean energy plan would drive up energy costs and damage a struggling economy. Democrats say saving the planet is more important than the short-term problem of higher energy bills.
NPR

Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless

Young entrepreneurs in Africa say that they're leading a tech movement from the ground up. They think technology can solve social ills. But critics wonder if digital fixes can make a dent.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.