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D.C. Police Show Off New Evidence Warehouse

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Police Chief Cathy Lanier inside the state-of-the-art evidence warehouse in Southwest D.C.
Patrick Madden
Police Chief Cathy Lanier inside the state-of-the-art evidence warehouse in Southwest D.C.

They say the $20 million facility is a major improvement over the old warehouse.

How state of the art? Every piece of evidence that comes into the facility is weighed, scanned, bar-coded, bagged and tagged and then a computer actually figures out where the most efficient place to put the evidence is.

Or consider how narcotics will now be stored: in a room where the temperature, the oxygen, even the amount of static electricity is controlled -- in the last case to prevent PCP from igniting.

Police Chief Cathy Lanier says the new facility will dramatically improve how the police are able to track and retrieve evidence.

Asked if the new warehouse is a defense attorney's nightmare, the chief responded, "absolutely."

The facility will also have freezers to store DNA and neck-straining, three-and-a-half story shelves to store the physical evidence.

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