WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Latest D.C. News

Play associated audio

WASHINGTON (AP) Officials say there will be military training flights in the Washington area on Thursday. The North American Aerospace Defense Command says the flight will be from midnight to three a.m. involving Air Force and Civil Air Patrol aircraft.

WASHINGTON (AP) A D.C. man who falsely claimed to be a Congressman from Georgia won't face charges after all. Prosecutors today moved to dismiss a case against D.C. resident Walter Nelson Lewis Junior for wearing a lapel pin reserved for members of Congress.

WASHINGTON (AP) News analysts say a hidden-camera video by conservative activist James O'Keefe targeting NPR was edited to showcase inflammatory remarks from a public radio executive. Analysts from the Poynter Institute and The Blaze told NPR they found a short version of the video deceiving when compared with the full two-hour tape.

WASHINGTON (AP) First lady Michelle Obama is discussing her campaign to combat childhood obesity during a conference in Washington. Obama is scheduled to address the National League of Cities conference today about her "Let's Move!" physical fitness campaign.

NPR

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
NPR

Wanted: More Bulls With No Horns

Most U.S. dairy cows are born with horns, but most farms remove them. Animal welfare groups say dehorning is cruel. Instead, they want ranchers to breed more hornless cattle into their herds.
NPR

Oil Prices Tumble Again, Hurting Drillers But Helping Drivers

Oil prices are falling, down sharply since mid-June to just over $45 a barrel. That has affected gasoline prices, now down to an average of $2.65 a gallon, about 85 cents less than a year ago.
NPR

Author: Tech Firms' Rhetoric Outpaces The Actual Good They Do

Author Kentaro Toyama says despite tech firms' good intentions, using technology to solve social problems falls short. NPR's Audie Cornish talks to Toyama about his new book.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.