Fenty Exonerated In Report On Contracting Scandal | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Fenty Exonerated In Report On Contracting Scandal

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The contracting scandal involving two fraternity brothers of then Mayor Adrian Fenty, led to repeated charges of cronyism by opponent Vincent Gray during the mayoral campaign.

While the 258-page report by D.C. attorney Robert Trout exonerates Fenty, it says the firm is at the heart of the controversy. Led by Fenty's friends and fraternity brothers, Omar Karim and Sinclair Skinner, the firm may have overcharged the city for their services.

The multimillion-dollar contract was awarded to help oversee construction projects at city parks and rec centers.

The report also says Karim and Skinner were evasive during the investigation, something council member Harry Thomas says should be referred to the U.S. Attorney's Office.

"Bottom line, there was information withheld, and possibilities of perjury, and other issues that some of the people indicated in this report that need to be reported," Thomas says.

Skinner, meanwhile, held a press conference outside the Wilson Building to say he felt vindicated by the report's findings.

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