Commentary By John DeGioia: Don't Cut Federal Student Aid | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Commentary By John DeGioia: Don't Cut Federal Student Aid

Play associated audio

As students across America await college admissions decisions, we must actively work together to help them afford to go. As a university president, I'm making sure we do our part. Now is the time for Congress to do theirs.

Student financial aid is truly a public-private partnership essential to helping our young people make the most of their promise and potential.

There is no question that serious action needs to be taken to reduce federal deficits and to put the nation on track to pay down the federal debt. But it makes little sense to slash programs -– like federal student aid –- that are key to building the future in an increasingly knowledge-based economy.

Families, especially in these difficult economic times, rely on federal student aid to help pay for their education. These resources are critical to make college a reality for millions of young people.

At Georgetown we're proud to provide more than $80 million of our own dollars to defray costs for nearly half of our undergraduates. We do this because we believe it's the right thing to do to help all students who are admitted to be able to afford to come. But we can't do it alone and include federal aid in more than 40 percent of our undergraduates' financial aid packages.

Long-proven federal student aid programs, including Pell grants and Supplemental Education Opportunity Grants (SEOG), provide resources for low- and middle-income students to pursue their educational dreams. Cuts to these programs would be ill-conceived and harmful to the nation's economic recovery, and they would undermine the partnership that has opened the doors of higher education to millions of Americans over recent decades.

It would be wrong to those young people for Congress to reverse course and make us take away or cut Pell or SEOG grants. It would also be wrong for the nation's future.

These programs are investments in the very people who will lead in tackling our nation's greatest challenges: national security, innovation and job creation. Their contributions -- and the taxes they will be paying -- are critical as well to ending deficits and then paying down the national debt.

What do you think? Join The Conversation and visit the Commentary Forum.

NPR

Independent Theater Owner In D.C. Gets Ready To Screen 'The Interview'

West End Cinema's Josh Levin, preparing to show The Interview, speaks with Audie Cornish about what sparked a decision to host the controversial film (Sony Pictures had canceled the release).
NPR

Guyanese Christmas Gives A Whole New Meaning To Slow Food

Two classic Christmas dishes beloved by the people of Guyana are pepperpot and garlic pork. To get the flavors just right, you have to cook them and let them sit out for weeks.
NPR

With New Congress, Will Obama Work Differently?

The GOP-led Congress President Obama will have to deal with for the last two years of his presidency is a stark contrast to the Democratic-led one he came in with. Does that mean Obama will change his approach to dealing with Capitol Hill?
NPR

2014 Hashtags: #BringBackOurGirls Made Nigerian Schoolgirls All Of 'Ours'

As part of a series on hashtag activism in 2014, Audie Cornish speaks with Obiageli Ezekwesili of the Open Society Foundation. Ezekwesili was one of the early promoters of the hashtag #bringbackourgirls, about schoolgirls kidnapped in Nigeria in April.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.