'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(March 15-May 2) THE WORDS OF EDNA WALSH Northwest Washington's Studio Theatre has decided to broaden its horizons by presenting more productions originating outside these United States. First up is "New Ireland: The Edna Walsh Festival". Three of the inventive playwright's works are presented through mid May beginning with Penelope. Four competitive suitors dressed in Speedos and bathrobes woo a beautiful young woman at the bottom of a drained swimming pool in the production inspired by Homer's Odyssey.

(March 15-Aug. 14) DOWN TO THE WIRE Alexander Calder is best known for his outsized abstract mobiles and sculptures, but the artist's singular portraiture promises to switch things up at Washington's National Portrait Gallery. Throughout his career Calder shaped wire into three-dimensional caricatures of prominent figures' faces and then hung them from the ceiling to sway and have a life of their own. "Calder's Portraits: A New Language" is on view through mid-August.

Music: "Lipstique" by Trevor Bastow

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