'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(March 10-19) JUST LIKE THE TOOTH FAIRY If you're looking for "An Ideal Husband", Shakespeare Theatre Company has you covered, at least through mid April. Oscar Wilde's comedy about an English politician with a potentially damaging history of indiscretion plays at the Sidney Harman Hall on F Street.

(March 11-Sept. 5) TO MAKE A WORLD Just around the block the American Art Museum is opening a new exhibit of some decades old paintings Friday. "To Make a World: George Ault and 1940s America" showcases the master painter's depictions of quiet and eerie scenes from the tumultuous decade -- depictions that perfectly capture the fragility and anxiety of a Great Depression and a World War.

(March 10) BILL CUNNINGHAM NEW YORK New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham has been capturing the city's fashion on his bike for half a century. "Bill Cunningham New York", a 2009 documentary about the man and his city, screens Thursday night at the Hirshhorn Museum on the National Mall.

Music: "Keep Dreamin'" by The Stuyvesants

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