Virginia's Public Media Funding In Governor's Hands | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Virginia's Public Media Funding In Governor's Hands

Play associated audio

Delegates agreed to McDonnell's proposal to slice state funding in half, but senators did not. House Appropriations Staff Director Robert Vaughn said the resulting compromise reduced Public TV grants from $1.4 million to $486,000 -- but increased other funds:

"What the budget conferees agreed to, relative to the governor's budget amendments, is to restore funding to the education component and that was to provide $2.6 million. The original budget, when adopted last session, was $2.1 million, so that's an increase over the actual budget they would have received," Vaughn says.

Vaughn said lawmakers approved the governor's plan to preserve funds for Radio Reading Services for the print-disabled and re-direct dollars that had been earmarked for state tourism promotion.

"Public radio, then, was untouched," he says.

The governor could agree, propose changes, or exercise a line-item veto before April's Reconvened Session.

WAMU does not receive funding from the Commonwealth.

NPR

Impressionist Hero Édouard Manet Gets The Star Treatment In Los Angeles

Manet was not himself an Impressionist, but he mightily influenced the movement. Two of his paintings are now in L.A. The Railway is making its West Coast debut, and Spring just sold for $65 million.
NPR

Stone Age Britons Were Eating Wheat 2,000 Years Before They Farmed It

Scientists have recovered cultivated wheat DNA from an 8,000-year-old submerged site off the British coast. The finding suggests hunter-gatherers were trading for the grain long before they grew it.
NPR

Jeb Bush Takes 2016 Show Into Unfriendly Territory At CPAC

Bush has appeared almost exclusively before friendly audiences since leaving the Florida governorship eight years ago, but today he faces a crowd of conservative activists.
NPR

'Ballot Selfies' Clash With The Sanctity Of Secret Polling

New Hampshire is the first state to outlaw voting booth selfies. Some call the ban unconstitutional and are challenging it in court. Others argue selfies compromise privacy and enable voter coercion.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.