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Names Of Maryland Tax Scofflaws Published

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Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot releases a list of top tax scofflaws in Maryland.
Matt Bush
Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot releases a list of top tax scofflaws in Maryland.

This year, the largest scofflaws by far are Jacques and Marlene Rubin, who owe the state more than $4.5 million in back taxes. The Rubins don't even live in Maryland anymore.

Comptroller Peter Franchot says they live in Palm Beach, Fla. Franchot would not go into the specifics of how the Rubins were able to run up such a large liability, but he did say they know how much they owe, and that they have the means to pay it.

"While they're down there at an ocean front condo, looking at the beach and watching the sunset, with gosh knows how many million dollars in assets, owing us 4.5 million...We're up here struggling to make the state work in these tough economic times," he says.

Franchot says publishing the names has been successful in the past, as his office has collected more than $26 million since they started doing it 11 years ago.

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