WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Mayor Names D.C. Schools Chancellor

Play associated audio
D.C. Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson (left) was appointed by Mayor Vincent Gray (right) in March.  The D.C. Council confirmed her appointment Tuesday.
Kavitha Cardoza
D.C. Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson (left) was appointed by Mayor Vincent Gray (right) in March. The D.C. Council confirmed her appointment Tuesday.

Gray says he didn't want the selection panel he put together to look at resumes from around the country when he knew he wanted Henderson for the top spot.

"She's been in the city for a number of years working around education, and I think to ensure continuity at this stage is extremely important," he says.

Henderson says she'll continue what she calls an "urgent and relentless" push for high quality teachers. But she says she'll also focus on involving the community.

"One of the things we really have not done well over the last 3.5 years is around community engagement and transparency. And so we will work to ensure that everyone understands that they are part of this reform. These are not my schools, these are our schools," she says.

Henderson is being paid $275,000 a year, the same as her predecessor, Michelle Rhee. She still needs to be confirmed by the city council.

NPR

Pack These Pages: Three Must-Reads For Summer

Harriet Logan, owner of Loganberry Books in Shaker Heights, Ohio, recommends a graphic novel about trash, a George Eliot classic and a children's book about a bear pianist.
NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
NPR

Obama: Globalization Is 'Here' And 'Done'

Warning against withdrawing from trade deals, the president acknowledged a legitimate gripe with globalization, but says focusing only on local markets is the wrong medicine.
NPR

Facebook Shakes Up News Feed, But We Still Don't Know Exactly How It Works

It will now prioritize posts from friends and family — potentially bad news for media companies relying on Facebook for traffic. The company has been under pressure to defend its political neutrality.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.