WAMU 88.5 : News

Connolly Bill Would Give Mortgage Help To More Military Families

Play associated audio

The Pentagon's Homeowners Assistance Program is designed to help military families upside-down on their home mortgages, but it doesn't cover homes purchased after July of 2006, even though the mortgage crisis was still in full swing.

Virginia Rep. Gerry Connolly is sponsoring a bill that would fix that.

"There are a lot of military families who find that through no fault of their own, their house is worth a lot less today than it was when they first purchased them," he says.

Lt. Col. Christopher Meredith recently transferred out of the area, but since foreclosure or a shortsale isn't allowed for servicemembers, he was forced to hang onto the Woodbridge home he bought in 2007 and rent it out.

But his tenants left in October and since then he's paid the $2,800 monthly bill by dipping into his family's retirement savings.

"We're gonna feel this again in 18 years, because you can't make up for time lost in investments for retirement," he says.

Meredith says he feels worst for service members serving overseas who have to worry about spouses making ends meet back home.

WAMU 88.5

Remains In Jamestown Linked To Early Colonial Leaders

Scientists from the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and The Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation say they've identified four men buried in the earliest English church in America.
WAMU 88.5

The Democracy Of The Diner

Whether the decor is faux '50s silver and neon or authentic greasy spoon, diners are classic Americana, down to the familiar menu items. Rich, poor, black, white--all rub shoulders in the vinyl booths and at formica counters. We explore the enduring appeal and nostalgia of the diner.

WAMU 88.5

D.C. Council Member David Grosso

D.C. Council Member and Chair of the Committee on Education David Grosso joins us to discuss local public policy issues, including the challenges facing D.C. Public Schools.

NPR

Researchers Warn Against 'Autonomous Weapons' Arms Race

Already, researcher Stuart Russell says, sentry robots in South Korea "can spot and track a human being for a distance of 2 miles — and can very accurately kill that person."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.