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D.C. Office Of Campaign Finance To Probe Sulaimon Brown Allegations

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Brown has accused Mayor Vincent Gray and members of his campaign of promising Brown a job and cash in exchange for the candidate's continued attacks on then-Mayor Adrian Fenty.

Add the Office of Campaign Finance to the list of groups probing the quid pro quo allegations made by Brown.

Brown told the Washington Post the Gray campaign paid him cash, and that he funneled some of the money into his campaign coffers using fake names.

"The audit division will be reviewing the reports to determine if they are accurate and that is the extent of where we are at this stage," says William Sanford, general counsel at the campaign finance office.

Gray has already tapped acting Attorney General Irv Nathan to look into the allegations, and D.C. Council Chair Kwame Brown has referred the matter to the city's inspector general.

Gray and his aides have steadfastly denied any wrong doing. The mayor says he did promise Brown a job interview, but he never promised a job. Brown was hired in early February in the city's Department of Health Care Finance and fired less than a month later.

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