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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(March 5-June 5) BROADWAY AND DINNER Toby's Dinner Theatre in Baltimore salutes Broadway through early June in "42nd Street". The musical follows an aspiring chorus girl working on being in the right place at the right time.

(March 8) BOOM TOWN If you're day ends upside down you may want to spend your evening enjoying Cirque Mechanics Boom Town Tuesday night at Bethesda's Strathmore. Aerialists, gymnasts, dancers and clowns portray prospectors in an 1865 mining town in the production by a Cirque du Soleil alum.

(March 8) FAT TUESDAY TUNES Fat Tuesday is here and there several celebrations in and around the District. Clarendon has a parade Tuesday at 8 p.m., Northwest Washington's Red Derby throws a Mardi Gras party, and Baltimore band [Junkyard Saints (http://artisphere.com/calendar/event-details/Dancing/Junkyard-Saints.aspx ) does its own brand of Big Easy music Tuesday night at Arlington's Artisphere. If you plan on cutting a rug Artisphere has dance lessons before the show at 7:30 p.m.

Music: "Bourbon Street Parade" by Forgotten Souls Brass Band

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this Art Beat stated that "41st Street" was playing at Toby's Dinner Theatre. The musical is called "42nd Street."

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