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Students Speak Out Against UDC President

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UDC students wait outside administrative offices Monday to hear if the president will resign.
Matt Laslo
UDC students wait outside administrative offices Monday to hear if the president will resign.

Many students say they are outraged that Sessoms took a business class flight to Egypt that cost just a little less then their yearly tuition. Student Senate President Michael Bottens says that kind of spending is unacceptable.

"...My money was stolen from me. The money that I pay," he says.

But Sessoms denies the allegations, which include waiting until the last minute to purchase plane tickets, including several on first class flights. He says a circulatory problem requires him to fly first class so he can recline. And Sessoms says the travel is essential to his job.

"...People have got to believe that you are worth the investment. That's what presidents do, they travel around trying to convince folks that we're worth the investment," he says.

A group of students plans to file a lawsuit against Sessoms to try to recover their funds.

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