'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(March 4-13) BEWARE THE INTERSECTIONS OF MARCH Northeast Washington's Atlas Performing Arts Center has an ambitious selection of performance to offer this and next weekend as part of its Intersections festival. Theater, dance, music, spoken word, film and visual art from across planet Earth cover all the bases.

(March 4) BARD LAUGHS If you like your Shakespeare silly, there's The Acting Company’s presentation of The Comedy of Errors Friday night at George Mason University's Center for the Arts in Fairfax. Witty wordplay, pervasive puns and mistaken identities are par for the course.

(March 5) COLOR AT THE CORCORAN Local artists help the District's Corcoran Gallery celebrate the vibrancy of life during D.C. Color Splash Saturday. The family festival features art workshops, local musicians and tap dancing.

(March 6) SAINT MISBEHAVIN' The long wait for a Wavy Gravy documentary ends Sunday afternoon at the Arlington Cinema & Drafthouse. Saint Misbehavin' tells the counter-culture clown's story from Woodstock MC to Ben & Jerry's ice cream flavor. Dr. Patch Adams will be on hand to take questions.

Music: "Wave" by Brad Mehldau

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