'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(March 3-6) ON THE RAZZLE If you're in the mood for some screwball comedy, Constellation Theatre Company has Tom Stoppard's "On The Razzle" for a few more nights in Northwest Washington. Two curious shop clerks from a small Austrian village help themselves to a day of sheer shenanigans in Vienna.

(March 3-April 2) REALLY DARK COMEDY And for some really, really dark comedy there's "Morgue Story", opening Wednesday night at Northwest's 1409 Playbill Cafe. D.C.'s proudly morbid Molotov Theatre Group adapts an underground Brazilian film about three eccentric friends who aren't bothered by having to hang out at a morgue.

(March 4) MORE STORY, MORE STEREO Bethesda's Writer's Center resumes its Story/Stereo series Thursday night. Emerging authors Matthew Pitt and James Hannaham discuss their prose and share the stage with the contemplative acoustic-pop of The Caribbean, a band from Washington, D.C.

Music: "Clicks Like That" by PRIMARY 1

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