New Allegations Of Mismanagement At Airports Authority | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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New Allegations Of Mismanagement At Airports Authority

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The FAA has stopped work on dozens of projects and furloughed nearly 1,000 employees after Congress failed to reach an agreement on its budget.
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The FAA has stopped work on dozens of projects and furloughed nearly 1,000 employees after Congress failed to reach an agreement on its budget.

In a letter obtained by WAMU News, Virginia Del. Joe May says the terms of three members of the Authority's board of directors have expired, but they still exercise full voting privileges. He also says the board is making key personnel decisions with many members not in attendance.

May is a Republican from Loudoun County and the chair of Virginia's House Transportation Committee. He says he's worried some Airports Authority decisions won't stand up to outside scrutiny. Right now, the Authority's governance practices are subject to two seperate federal audits.

In the letter, May asks the board's chairman, Charles Snelling, to appear before his committee in Richmond later this month.

Snelling says he will do so, and he also says the issues May is raising are not under the Authority's control.

Letter To Airports Authority
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