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RICHMOND, Va. (AP) State officials say 25 jobs will be created in an expansion of a Danville plant that creates driver's licenses and identification cards for the Department of Motor Vehicles. Gov. McDonnell announced the $1.1 million expansion today.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) The announcement that the governor is revamping the parole board has caused prisoner advocates to be hopeful that more inmates will be granted early release. A spokesman for Gov. McDonnell says the new appointees understand his focus on successful prisoner re-entry.

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (AP) Next Friday, more than 2,000 acres of the Lynnhaven River will be reopened to unrestricted oyster and clam harvesting. Those areas have been closed since last November to shellfish harvesting because of high bacteria levels.

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) A former Alabama bank executive has pleaded guilty to a fraud conspiracy that led to the collapse of the bank. Catherine Kissick admitted that she conspired with executives at a mortgage lender to buy hundreds of millions of dollars in worthless mortgages.

(Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
WAMU 88.5

World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

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