'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

Play associated audio

(March 2-May 15) BECOMING BLINKY German abstract painter Blinky Palermo's work is best appreciated en masse, which is possible stateside for the first time at the Hirshhorn Museum on the National Mall through mid-May. Blinky Palermo: Retrospective 1964-1977 highlights the evolution of the painter's trademark bold colors and geometric shapes from his early shift away from traditional materials to his late works of acrylic paint on metal.

(March 2-20) ONE COLORFUL COAT For more bold colors, there's Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat at Maryland's Olney Theatre until late March. The favorite of Jacob's 12 sons is sold into slavery by his jealous brothers, only to end up on top with a better wardrobe in the musical by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber.

(March 2-6) MIDDLE BROTHER New York's Middle Brother is a trio of unrelated folk-rockers. The frontmen of three separate bands decided that their harmonic abilities would blend better together than apart. The poppy results play out Tuesday night at the 9:30 Club in Northwest Washington.

Music: "Schrapnell" by Isolée

NPR

'Night At The Fiestas' Spins Stories Of Faith And Family

Kirstin Valdez Quade's debut book of short fiction is inspired by her family and its long history in the "romanticized" region of northern New Mexico.
NPR

Not Just Sugary-Sweet, Hard Cider Makes A Comeback

Cider is the fastest-growing alcoholic beverage in the United States. Much of that growth is driven by big industrial producers, but smaller cider-makers are looking for a larger bite of the apple.
NPR

Nigerian President Faces Tough Reelection Campaign

Nigerians head to the polls Saturday to vote for their new president. The incumbent Goodluck Jonathan faces former military leader, Muhammadu Buhari, who says he's tough on security and corruption.
NPR

App That Aims To Make Books 'Squeaky Clean' Draws Ire From Edited Writers

Clean Reader — an app designed to find, block and replace profanity in books — has drawn considerable criticism from authors. This week, makers of the app announced they would no longer sell e-books.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.