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Md. Lawmakers Hold Hearings For New Medical Pot Law

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Under current Maryland law, using marijuana with a medical excuse is limited to a $100 fine.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/eggrole/4822581291/
Under current Maryland law, using marijuana with a medical excuse is limited to a $100 fine.

Barry Considine suffers from a number of chronic motion restricting illnesses. He claims prescription drugs no longer relieve his pain, but marijuana does.

At a recent hearing in Annapolis he explained why he uses it and the ironic circumstance it creates in his life.

"I've spent 10 years of my life living on vicodin and flexeril and the latest, greatest arthritis drug to come down the pike that year," he says. "One of those drugs was viox and it caused a stroke. I've been through surgeries, I've been through radio frequency nerve abatement. I've done it all and I break the law periodically to get some relief."

The new bill would allow doctors to prescribe marijuana for patients with chronic pain or illness and would set up a network of state-registered growers and dispensaries.

The state's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has rejected the measure and recommends further study.

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