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Libyan Protesters Can't Raise Pre-Gadhafi Flag At Embassy

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When a group of protesters wielding what they call the "rightful" Libyan flag tried to enter the embassy building, they were told they couldn't because the embassy was closed and the building was private property.

"Not allowing us to change our flag, our beautiful, constitutional flag," Ahmed Nabbus says.

Nabbus was one of several dozen protesters chanting for an end to President Moammar Gadhafi's reign.

"Forty-two years is enough. Enough murder, enough pain, enough killing that he did," Nabbus says.

Kadija Sherif left Libya in the 1970s.

"Our names our on his black list and it's not safe for us to go back," Sherif says.

After the protesters were denied entry to the embassy building, several members of Congress showed up and were allowed inside.

They gave a brief statement after coming out stressing that they support and recognize Ali Aujali as the true Libyan ambassador. Aujali had resigned his post in a show of support for the Libyan opposition. He was also there Tuesday and greeted like a hero by protesters.

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