'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(Feb. 28) PALESTINIAN PEACE DOCTOR "I Shall Not Hate" is a hopeful and heartbreaking first-person account of life in Gaza. It was written by Harvard-trained Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish, who was born and raised in Gaza and has spent most of his life crossing the lines that divide Israelis and Palestinians. Abuelaish discusses his quest for peace tonight at the Sixth & I Historic Synagogue in Northwest Washington.

(March 1-April 24) ARENA'S NOT AFRAID OF EDWARD ALBEE Southwest's Arena Stage is throwing a festival for its favorite living American playwright. You can enjoy performances of Edward Albee's "Who's Afriad of Virginia Woolf?" and "At Home at the Zoo" through April.

(Feb. 28-May 13) LISTEN TO HIM As far as artful chairs go, you can't do much better than the work of Joel D'Orazio, whose work is showcased in "Listen to Me" at Zenith Gallery in Northwest through mid-May. In addition to chairs, the artist uses found materials to fashion abstract sculptures and he paints, too.

Music: "Such Great Heights" by The Postal Service

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For Anniversary Of President's Death, Ford's Theatre Focuses On Mrs. Lincoln

The very theater where President Lincoln was assassinated 150 years ago is remembering the woman who felt that great loss most accutely — The Widow Lincoln.

NPR

College Life Doesn't Have To Mean Crummy Cuisine, Says Dorm Room Chef

Sick of dining hall pizza, public health student Emily Hu taught herself how to cook — even with no oven. Now she's hoping to inspire her peers to pick up cooking skills and healthier eating habits.
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Democrat Seeks To Authorize Operations Against ISIS

Rep. Adam Schiff of California plans to introduce a bill to allow congressional authorization of military operations against ISIS. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Rep. Schiff about the new legislation.
NPR

In Sweden, Remote-Control Airport Is A Reality

Sweden is the first country in the world to use new technology to land passenger airplanes remotely. At an airport in a tiny town, flights are guided by operators sitting miles away.

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