WAMU 88.5 : News

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

Play associated audio

(Feb. 26) STAY POSITIVE Positive Force D.C. has been a source of music, art and activism in the District for a quarter century. The group holds a benefit concert with local rock bands, including Ra Ra Rasputin and Title Tracks Saturday night at St. Stephen's Church in Northwest.

(Feb. 25-March 26) 100 YEARS OF TENNESSEE Georgetown University's Department of Performing Arts continues to celebrate the centennial of Tennessee Williams' birth with "The Glass Menagerie" this weekend through the end of March.

(Feb. 26-July 31) BLAST FROM THE BUDDHIST PAST Time hasn't been kind to a set of sixth-century Buddhist sculptures from China, but Washington's Sackler Gallery has found a 21st century fix: "Echoes of the Past: The Buddhist Cave Temples of Xiangtangshan" opens Saturday with digital recreations of the sculptures and a video installation of one of the cave-temples that housed them.

(Feb. 26) SUPER MARIO SYMPHONY Bethesda's Strathmore pays tribute to decades of technology Saturday with Video Games Live. Members of the National Philharmonic perform the scores to your favorite video games in front of some epic visual aids.

Music: "The Legend of Zelda Theme (FFYears remix)" by Koji Kondo

NPR

Writing The Wicked Ways Of The 'Worst. Person. Ever.'

Raymond Gunt is profane, rude, heartless and truly the Worst. Person. Ever. Author Douglas Coupland says he's not exactly sure how the character, with no redeeming qualities, came into his mind.
NPR

Can Wal-Mart Really Make Organic Food Cheap For Everyone?

The giant retailer says it's adding a new line of organic food that's at least 25 percent cheaper. But a large-scale production and supply of organic food likely can't be achieved overnight.
NPR

Obama Adds Malaysia To His Asia Itinerary

Obama travels to Malaysia next week, where the government is under fire for the handling of a missing airliner. NPR's Wade Goodwyn talks to Joshua Kurlantzick of the Council on Foreign Relations.
NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.