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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(Feb. 26) STAY POSITIVE Positive Force D.C. has been a source of music, art and activism in the District for a quarter century. The group holds a benefit concert with local rock bands, including Ra Ra Rasputin and Title Tracks Saturday night at St. Stephen's Church in Northwest.

(Feb. 25-March 26) 100 YEARS OF TENNESSEE Georgetown University's Department of Performing Arts continues to celebrate the centennial of Tennessee Williams' birth with "The Glass Menagerie" this weekend through the end of March.

(Feb. 26-July 31) BLAST FROM THE BUDDHIST PAST Time hasn't been kind to a set of sixth-century Buddhist sculptures from China, but Washington's Sackler Gallery has found a 21st century fix: "Echoes of the Past: The Buddhist Cave Temples of Xiangtangshan" opens Saturday with digital recreations of the sculptures and a video installation of one of the cave-temples that housed them.

(Feb. 26) SUPER MARIO SYMPHONY Bethesda's Strathmore pays tribute to decades of technology Saturday with Video Games Live. Members of the National Philharmonic perform the scores to your favorite video games in front of some epic visual aids.

Music: "The Legend of Zelda Theme (FFYears remix)" by Koji Kondo

NPR

Trump Off Camera: The Man Behind The 'In-Your-Face Provocateur'

Biographer Marc Fisher says Donald Trump has lived a "strikingly solitary life given how public he is." Fisher and his Washington Post colleague Michael Kranish are the authors of Trump Revealed.
NPR

Soda Tax Drives Down Sales In Berkeley, Calif.

According to interviews conducted before and after Berkeley imposed a tax on sugary drinks, the tax is having the desired effect. People reported drinking 20 percent fewer sugar-sweetened drinks after the tax went into effect.
NPR

Pennsylvania Trump Supporters Grapple With Their Candidate's Rough Summer

In central Pennsylvania, a farm family, the CEO of a small paper mill and a student at Penn State University — all Trump supporters — weigh in on the candidate's claim of potential voter fraud.
WAMU 88.5

Why We Open Our Hearts And Wallets For Some Disasters—But Not Others

Flooding in Louisiana has caused tens of millions of dollars in property damage and untold personal misery. But public response has been slow. Join us to talk about why we open our hearts and wallets for some disasters and not others.

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