'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(Feb. 26) STAY POSITIVE Positive Force D.C. has been a source of music, art and activism in the District for a quarter century. The group holds a benefit concert with local rock bands, including Ra Ra Rasputin and Title Tracks Saturday night at St. Stephen's Church in Northwest.

(Feb. 25-March 26) 100 YEARS OF TENNESSEE Georgetown University's Department of Performing Arts continues to celebrate the centennial of Tennessee Williams' birth with "The Glass Menagerie" this weekend through the end of March.

(Feb. 26-July 31) BLAST FROM THE BUDDHIST PAST Time hasn't been kind to a set of sixth-century Buddhist sculptures from China, but Washington's Sackler Gallery has found a 21st century fix: "Echoes of the Past: The Buddhist Cave Temples of Xiangtangshan" opens Saturday with digital recreations of the sculptures and a video installation of one of the cave-temples that housed them.

(Feb. 26) SUPER MARIO SYMPHONY Bethesda's Strathmore pays tribute to decades of technology Saturday with Video Games Live. Members of the National Philharmonic perform the scores to your favorite video games in front of some epic visual aids.

Music: "The Legend of Zelda Theme (FFYears remix)" by Koji Kondo

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