WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Baltimore Group Creates Local Currency

Play associated audio
An association in Baltimore wants to promote a currency that could be used instead of regular money at local businesses.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/free-stock/4792018574/
An association in Baltimore wants to promote a currency that could be used instead of regular money at local businesses.

Inside of a yoga studio that was once a factory in Baltimore's Hampden neighborhood, people are talking about a new system of paper money for the city of Baltimore.

Jeff Dicken is with Baltimore Green Currency Association, the group behind what's being called the BNote.

"A BNote is a paper currency...money by the people, for the people, and it can be accepted by anybody in the community who feels like they can circulate it," he says.

So far, 25 businesses in Hampden have signed on to accept the BNote. In theory, it works like this: you buy 11 BNotes for $10, which you can spend at participating local businesses just like your regular greenback.

Dicken is hoping that the BNote will eventually gain enough momentum to continue on after a buyer's initial purchase.

"We have the restaurants buying from local food producers from local farms, we have the farms buying from local hardware stores...it will create these supply chains that can lead to permanent circulation of the BNote," he says.

The design for the BNote will be revealed on Friday. The currency is scheduled to launch in April.

NPR

With 'Formation,' Beyoncé Lights Up The Internet. Here's What People Are Saying

The singer's new music video quickly drew commentary of all kinds — on its references to being black in America, Hurricane Katrina and Black Lives Matter.
NPR

Calif. Restaurant Gives Diners — And Sea Lions — An Ocean View

The Marine Room is a restaurant right on the beach. When the tide is high, waves hit the windows, and bring in unexpected visitors.
NPR

What Do Sanders And Trump Have In Common? More Than You Think

The two hottest candidates heading into Tuesday's New Hampshire primary: Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. On the face of it, the candidates and their messages couldn't be more different.
NPR

Super Bowl 50 Tightens Cybersecurity

This year's Super Bowl will be held in the most technologically advanced stadium in the world. FBI special agent John Lightfoot talks to NPR's Rachel Martin about the threat of cyber attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.