Maryland Gets Funding To Tackle Child Hunger | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Maryland Gets Funding To Tackle Child Hunger

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The announcement of the grant follows a new survey suggesting there's more to be done in schools to address the problem.

The survey, from the nonprofit Share our Strength, asked teachers across the country to report how often students come to class hungry. Anne Sheridan, the organization's Maryland director, says almost two-thirds reported seeing children in their classrooms regularly coming to school hungry.

"This survey indicates that we need to do a better job of working together to make sure that school meals, particularly breakfast, are available to students," she says.

The new grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture is to increase participation in the national school breakfast program and the summer food service program.

Sheridan says there are several ways to do that: serve breakfast in classrooms or put food in a to-go box.

She says more than 300,000 students in Maryland qualify for free or reduced price meals. The challenge is to make it easier for students to access them.

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