WAMU 88.5 : News

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

Play associated audio

(Feb. 23-March 31) GET HITCHED During his six decades, Alfred Hitchcock made over 50 films, so programming a career retrospective is something of an undertaking. Silver Spring's AFI Silver breaks the pioneer's work into three parts this year, beginning with his early British films. "The Man Who Knew Too Much" screens Wednesday night and the series continues through the end of March.

(Feb. 24-March 12) ANARCHY IN THE UK For more stories about the UK in Silver Spring, there's "One Flea Spare" playing Thursday through March 12 at Round House Theatre. Quite possibly the only Black Plague comedy you'll come across, Naomi Wallace's bawdy play tests the limits of compassion in a story of sex, class and disease in 17th century London.

(Feb. 22) PRIVATE ARTS Opinions about sex and nudity in art galleries inspired "Censored 2011" on display now at artdc Gallery in Hyattsville. Artists exhibit revealing figure work, but the private parts are covered by Post-it Notes that viewers are invited to remove and reposition.

Music: "Gimme Some More (Instrumental)" by Busta Rhymes

NPR

Writing The Wicked Ways Of The 'Worst. Person. Ever.'

Raymond Gunt is profane, rude, heartless and truly the Worst. Person. Ever. Author Douglas Coupland says he's not exactly sure how the character, with no redeeming qualities, came into his mind.
NPR

Can Wal-Mart Really Make Organic Food Cheap For Everyone?

The giant retailer says it's adding a new line of organic food that's at least 25 percent cheaper. But a large-scale production and supply of organic food likely can't be achieved overnight.
NPR

Obama Adds Malaysia To His Asia Itinerary

Obama travels to Malaysia next week, where the government is under fire for the handling of a missing airliner. NPR's Wade Goodwyn talks to Joshua Kurlantzick of the Council on Foreign Relations.
NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.