'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

Play associated audio

(Feb. 23-March 31) GET HITCHED During his six decades, Alfred Hitchcock made over 50 films, so programming a career retrospective is something of an undertaking. Silver Spring's AFI Silver breaks the pioneer's work into three parts this year, beginning with his early British films. "The Man Who Knew Too Much" screens Wednesday night and the series continues through the end of March.

(Feb. 24-March 12) ANARCHY IN THE UK For more stories about the UK in Silver Spring, there's "One Flea Spare" playing Thursday through March 12 at Round House Theatre. Quite possibly the only Black Plague comedy you'll come across, Naomi Wallace's bawdy play tests the limits of compassion in a story of sex, class and disease in 17th century London.

(Feb. 22) PRIVATE ARTS Opinions about sex and nudity in art galleries inspired "Censored 2011" on display now at artdc Gallery in Hyattsville. Artists exhibit revealing figure work, but the private parts are covered by Post-it Notes that viewers are invited to remove and reposition.

Music: "Gimme Some More (Instrumental)" by Busta Rhymes

NPR

'Night At The Fiestas' Spins Stories Of Faith And Family

Kirstin Valdez Quade's debut book of short fiction is inspired by her family and its long history in the "romanticized" region of northern New Mexico.
NPR

Not Just Sugary-Sweet, Hard Cider Makes A Comeback

Cider is the fastest-growing alcoholic beverage in the United States. Much of that growth is driven by big industrial producers, but smaller cider-makers are looking for a larger bite of the apple.
NPR

Nigerian President Faces Tough Reelection Campaign

Nigerians head to the polls Saturday to vote for their new president. The incumbent Goodluck Jonathan faces former military leader, Muhammadu Buhari, who says he's tough on security and corruption.
NPR

App That Aims To Make Books 'Squeaky Clean' Draws Ire From Edited Writers

Clean Reader — an app designed to find, block and replace profanity in books — has drawn considerable criticism from authors. This week, makers of the app announced they would no longer sell e-books.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.