WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Salisbury's Favorite Son Fights For Middleweight Title

Play associated audio

Guerrero is one of Salisbury's favorite sons. He's also one of boxing brightest young stars.

Friday night's title fight at the Wicomico Youth and Civic Center will be broadcast on ESPN's "Friday Night Fights," and it seems like everywhere you look around this small town, there's a Fernando poster close by. At last night's official weigh in, hundreds of people gathered to watch Fernando tip the scales at 156 pounds.

But as Fernandos trainer, mentor and manager Hal Churnoff explains, it took a while for people to realize that the Dominican Republic-born -- but Salisbury-raised -- Guerrerro was the real deal.

"In the beginning, I believe a lot of people in the community didn't think it was real," Churnoff says. "Someone from Salisburynah, this is Salisbury, maybe hes a state champion or a champion of a division we've never heard of."

But the 24-year-old is ranked ninth in the world, undefeated at 20-0 and the southpaw has earned a reputation as a dangerous knockout artist.

Churnoff believes a win Friday night could make Guerrero a superstar in the boxing world.


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
WAMU 88.5

World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.