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Salisbury's Favorite Son Fights For Middleweight Title

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Guerrero is one of Salisbury's favorite sons. He's also one of boxing brightest young stars.

Friday night's title fight at the Wicomico Youth and Civic Center will be broadcast on ESPN's "Friday Night Fights," and it seems like everywhere you look around this small town, there's a Fernando poster close by. At last night's official weigh in, hundreds of people gathered to watch Fernando tip the scales at 156 pounds.

But as Fernandos trainer, mentor and manager Hal Churnoff explains, it took a while for people to realize that the Dominican Republic-born -- but Salisbury-raised -- Guerrerro was the real deal.

"In the beginning, I believe a lot of people in the community didn't think it was real," Churnoff says. "Someone from Salisburynah, this is Salisbury, maybe hes a state champion or a champion of a division we've never heard of."

But the 24-year-old is ranked ninth in the world, undefeated at 20-0 and the southpaw has earned a reputation as a dangerous knockout artist.

Churnoff believes a win Friday night could make Guerrero a superstar in the boxing world.

WAMU 88.5

Introducing Capital Soundtrack, A New WAMU Music Project

What does Washington sound like? Capital Soundtrack, a new music project from WAMU 88.5, explores that question.
NPR

Evaporated Cane Juice? Puh-leeze. Just Call It Sugar, FDA Says

Companies cultivating a healthful image often list "evaporated cane juice" in their products' ingredients. But the FDA says it's really just sugar, and that's what food labels should call it.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - May 27, 2016

Congress votes to override DC's 2013 ballot initiative on budget autonomy. Virginia governor faces a federal investigation over international finance and lobbying rules. And DC, Maryland and Virginia move to create a Metro safety oversight panel.

NPR

After Departure Of Uber, Lyft In Austin, New Companies Enter The Void

Earlier this month, voters in Austin, Texas, rejected an effort to overturn the city's rules for ride-hailing companies. Uber and Lyft tried to prevent fingerprinting of their drivers, and now both have left town. A few other ride-share companies have popped up to help fill the void. NPR explores how people are getting around town without Uber and Lyft.

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