WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

D.C. Water Eyes Rate Hike

Play associated audio
The D.C. Water and Sewer Authority released a positive assessment of the District's water quality June 21.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rickyromero/
The D.C. Water and Sewer Authority released a positive assessment of the District's water quality June 21.

The D.C. Water and Sewer Authority's board of directors has approved a rate increase.

The avereage household's bill would go up by about $6.50 annually -- and, if the increase is approved, it would be the second straight year D.C. Water has ordered a rate hike.

The board will take a final vote in September. In the meantime, D.C. Water plans to hold town halls in each ward to let the public weigh in.

General Manager George Hawkins says the rate increase will help D.C. Water replace the system's aging watermains and pipes which, as he notes, continue to break with increasing frequency.

"We have the funds on hand to fix those breaks, like a bandaid on a cut," Hawkins says. "In this case we want to improve the health of the system, not just fix the problem when it hits, which means replacing some of the older lines, not just putting a patch on them."

The new rates would go into effect Oct. 1.

NPR

Barbershop: UofL Basketball Ban, Football Concussions And The NFL Women's Summit

ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

'National Review' On How Donald Trump Is Changing The Campaign

The prominent conservative magazine National Review dedicated a whole issue to denouncing Donald Trump. Editor Rich Lowry talks about how Trump is reshaping the state of conservatism.
NPR

How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.