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D.C. Protesters Decry Violence In Bahrain

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Pro-peace group Code Pink organized Friday's protest.
Jessica Gould
Pro-peace group Code Pink organized Friday's protest.

About a dozen people stood outside the embassy gates, singing peace songs and chanting pro-democracy slogans. Radia Daoussi says she's been appalled by images of demonstrators being attacked in Bahrain's Pearl Square.

"These people are peaceful protestors asking for their basic rights, their human rights, right of assembly, right of freedom of expression. And you know they've been shot at with live ammunition, and even shot at while they're attending funeral processions. That's just unacceptable," she says.

And, as a native of Tunisia, she says she hopes her support echoes throughout the Middle East and North Africa.

"We're not free until everyone is free. Not just in that region but all around the world," she says.

Protesters also called on the United States to pressure Bahrain to stop the attacks.

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