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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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(Feb. 18) LITERARY REVOLUTION Azar Nafisi's "Reading Lolita in Tehran" is a best-selling book based on the author's experience teaching Western literature to female students in Iran after the revolution. Friday night you can see the story in opera form at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center in College Park.

(Feb. 19) FUN FIT FOR A PRESIDENT Presidents Day isn't until Monday, but the celebration beings Saturday with crafts, scavenger hunts and performances at Washington's National Portrait Gallery.

(Feb. 20) NUMBER TWO There's more presidential play Sunday at Alexandria's Lyceum. You can take a glimpse into the nation's second presidency as first lady Adams takes the stage with Navy Secretary Benjamin Stoddert to discuss life with President Adams and the nation's Quasi-War with France respectively.

(Feb. 19) ONE WORLD, MANY VOICES Presidents Day isn't the only reason to celebrate this weekend. Monday is also the 12th International Mother Language Day. You can dance in the name of language preservation at "One World, Many Voices", an evening of performance from across the globe Saturday night at Washington's Sixth and I Historic Synagogue.

Music: "I'm On Fire (Cousin Cole's Bad Desire Mix)" by Bruce Springsteen

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Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

McPherson, the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has died at 72. His work explored the intersection of white and black lives with deftness, subtlety and wry humor.
NPR

Oyster Archaeology: Ancient Trash Holds Clues To Sustainable Harvesting

Modern-day oyster populations in the Chesapeake are dwindling, but a multi-millennia archaeological survey shows that wasn't always the case. Native Americans harvested the shellfish sustainably.

WAMU 88.5

Your Turn: Ronald Reagan's Shooter, Freddie Gray Verdicts And More

Have opinions about the Democratic National Convention, or the verdicts from the Freddie Gray cases? It's your turn to talk.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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